Canagliflozin not associated with increased risk for fracture

Compared with a glucagon-line peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, canagliflozin was not associated with an increased risk for fracture in patients with type 2 diabetes at relatively low risk for fracture. Findings from a multidatabase cohort study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors promote glycosuria, resulting in possible effects on calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis. Some […]

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Why two people see the same thing but have different memories

Does it ever strike you as odd that you and a friend can experience the same event at the same time, but come away with different memories of what happened? So why is it that people can recall the same thing so differently? We all know memory isn’t perfect, and most memory differences are relatively trivial. But sometimes they can […]

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Incorrect prescribing alerts common for psychotropic meds

(HealthDay)—Incorrect prescribing alerts for psychotropic medications may be common, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. Katharine A. Phillips, M.D., from New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, and Leslie Citrome, M.D., M.P.H., from New York Medical College in Valhalla, examined the accuracy of automated prescribing warnings, with a focus on psychotropic medications, […]

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Two type 2 diabetes drugs linked to higher risk of heart disease

Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat Type 2 diabetes carry a high risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure or amputation, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.  “People should know if the medications they’re taking to treat their diabetes could lead to serious cardiovascular harm,” said lead author Dr. Matthew O’Brien, assistant professor of general internal […]

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Three breast cancer relapse tests recommended for NHS use

Three tests designed to predict if breast cancer will come back after treatment have been recommended for use on the NHS. The tests could help women with breast cancer and their doctors to decide whether to have chemotherapy after surgery. In its updated guidelines, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended the tests are offered to […]

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Test detects protein associated with Alzheimer’s and CTE

An ultrasensitive test has been developed that detects a corrupted protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. This advance could lead to early diagnosis of these conditions and open new research into how they originate, according to National Institutes of Health […]

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Molecule discovery holds promise for gene therapies for psoriasis

Scientists at the University of Birmingham have discovered a protein that could hold the key to novel gene therapies for skin problems including psoriasis—a common, chronic skin disease that affects over 100 million people worldwide. The protein is a fragment of a larger molecule, called JARID2, which was previously believed to only be present in the developing embryo, where it […]

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Study suggests universal meningitis vaccination is not cost-effective for college students

A computer-generated model developed by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers adds to evidence that providing universal vaccination against meningitis B infection to students entering college may be too costly to justify the absolute number of cases it would prevent. The study also suggests that if vaccine developers could significantly lower the price, universal vaccination might be worth requiring on college campuses. […]

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