New insights into the development and therapy of cancer

Oncologists at the University and University Hospital in Tübingen have discovered a new protein variant that plays an important role in the development and therapy response of cancer. For physicians, this discovery opens up the opportunity for new options in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The results of the study were published on Tuesday, April 2nd in the journal […]

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Kids with high blood pressure need smooth transition to adult care

A child diagnosed with high blood pressure should continue seeking treatment when he or she becomes an adult—and a newly published review looks at the medical guidelines that can help with the transition. A comparison of the separate blood pressure guidelines for children and adults found that efforts to bridge the care that adolescents receive as they shift to a […]

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‘Jumping genes’ drive many cancers

Mistakes in DNA are known to drive cancer growth. But a new study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, heavily implicates a genetic phenomenon commonly known as “jumping genes” in the growth of tumors. The study is published March 29 in the journal Nature Genetics. Since jumping genes aren’t mutations—mistakes in the letters of the DNA sequence—they […]

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A simple new blood test for tuberculosis

Testing for tuberculosis is fairly straightforward in most cases, but existing tests don’t work for everyone because they require something not everyone, especially kids and people with HIV/AIDS, can do: cough up fluid from their lungs. To solve that problem, a team led by Niaz Banaei, an associate professor of pathology and of medicine, and Juan Santiago, a professor of […]

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Emails show FDA worry after romaine outbreaks

After repeated food poisoning outbreaks tied to romaine lettuce, a U.S. food safety official shared his concerns in an internal email, saying the produce industry’s water testing “failed in an epic and tragic way.” How the industry tests water to grow leafy greens is “unacceptable” and needs to change, James Gorny, a senior adviser for produce safety at the Food […]

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Cancer prevention drug also disables H. pylori bacterium

A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered. The investigators found that in addition to its known ability to block the production of cell growth compounds, the drug DFMO (difluoromethylornithine) acts directly on the bacterium […]

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Most precise measurements of sickle cell disease building blocks could lead to new treatments

In a breakthrough study of sickle cell disease, biomedical engineers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have revealed that the building blocks of the disease are much less efficient at organizing than previously thought. The findings open the door to new treatments, including new medicines that could be prescribed at lower doses, for the approximately 20 […]

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Biomedical engineers grow cardiac patches to help people recover from heart attacks

Patching up a heart needs the help of tiny blood vessels. Aligning dense vascular structures in engineered cardiac patches can help patients recover from a heart attack. A team led by Feng Zhao, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Michigan Technological University, recently published two new papers on best practices in engineering prevascularized tissues. The team’s research paper, published in […]

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Taxane + platinum feasible for adjuvant tx in endometrial cancer

(HealthDay)—Taxane plus platinum regimens may be a reasonable alternative to doxorubicin plus cisplatin as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer that carries a high risk for progression, according to a study published online March 21 in JAMA Oncology. Hiroyuki Nomura, M.D., from the Keio University School of Medicine in Tokyo, and colleagues evaluated the clinical benefit of taxane plus platinum […]

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Brain stem cells age faster in multiple sclerosis patients

Brain stem cells in people with the most severe form of multiple sclerosis look much older than they really are, according to a study led by UConn Health and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The prematurely old cells act differently in the brain than normal ones, and could be the key to new treatments […]

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