Preventing addiction with insight from scruffy dogs and ancient meditation

When Ivan Pavlov was measuring dog slobber at the turn of the 20th century, he could not have imagined all the ways his classical conditioning research would shape the future of scientific discovery. Today, there is substantial research suggesting that conditioned behaviors—such as smoking after a meal—sustain unhealthy habits. It follows that by preventing the development of certain conditioned behaviors, […]

Read more

New tools and strategies for tuberculosis diagnosis, care, and elimination: A PLOS Medicine special

This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute. An estimated 10 million people developed tuberculosis (TB) and 1.6 million died of TB globally in 2017, making it […]

Read more

The risks of infectious mononucleosis

Infectious mononucleosis, or mono, sidelines high school athletes every year. Kids who play sports aren’t more susceptible to the disease. Instead, adolescent competitors are at a greater risk for one of the illness’s serious complications—splenic rupture. Mono starts with fatigue, sore throat, fever and swollen glands. By then, it’s invaded the lymphatic system, which can cause spleen enlargement. For athletes, […]

Read more

Blocking epigenetic Swiss army knife may be a new strategy for treating colorectal cancer

A new study out today in Cancer Cell shows that blocking specific regions of a protein called UHRF1 switches on hundreds of cancer-fighting genes, impairing colorectal cancer cells’ ability to grow and spread throughout the body. “Colorectal cancers are a growing public health problem, particularly in young people who haven’t yet reached the recommended age for regular screening,” said Scott […]

Read more

Cancer exports molecular ‘saboteurs’ to remotely disarm immune system

Immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized cancer treatment: many patients with malignancies that until recently would have been considered untreatable are experiencing long-term remissions. But the majority of patients don’t respond to these drugs, and they work far better in some cancers than others, for reasons that have befuddled scientists. Now, UC San Francisco researchers have identified a […]

Read more

Researchers uncover new cause of abdominal aortic aneurysm

Researchers have discovered that a family of lipids (fats) contribute to the development of a serious aortic disease, by driving clotting in the blood vessel wall. The findings could lead to the development of new treatments for this potentially life threatening condition. The team, led by researchers at Cardiff University, in collaboration with colleagues at Oxford and Erlangen, discovered that […]

Read more

Hepatitis C-infected hearts and lungs safely transplanted

Infectious diseases experts and transplant physicians and surgeons at Brigham and Women’s Hospital have blocked the transmission of hepatitis C from infected organ donors to recipients in need of hearts or lungs. The DONATE HCV Trial Team reports that hepatitis C-infected thoracic organs can be safely transplanted, detecting no signs of the disease and good outcomes for the transplanted organs […]

Read more

Slight decline in hepatitis C diagnoses in Europe

European surveillance data show a 10 percent decrease in newly reported hepatitis C cases between 2016 and 2017. However, with more than 31,000 recorded cases in 2017, diagnoses remain at a high level in the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA). In addition, variation in national testing practices and widespread under-reporting of diagnosed cases do not provide an accurate […]

Read more

Decades-old misconception on white blood cell trafficking to spleen corrected

Contrary to prior belief, white blood cells enter the spleen primarily via vessels in the red pulp. The research results contradict ideas regarding how the spleen produces antibodies vital for the human body. The spleen is our largest lymphoid organ. Its function is to eliminate outdated red blood cells and to produce antibodies against pathogens. Outdated red blood cells are […]

Read more
1 2 3 4 13