Embryonic microRNA fuels heart cell regeneration, researchers show

By adulthood, the heart is no longer able to replenish injured or diseased cells. As a result, heart disease or an event like a heart attack can be disastrous, leading to massive cell death and permanent declines in function. A new study by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM), however, shows that it may […]

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Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved

For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an important step towards developing effective inhibitors to fight tumor growth. Certain cancer cells depend on exporting the metabolite lactate, which accumulates during […]

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Treatment for common cause of diarrhea more promising

One of the most common causes of diarrhea worldwide – accounting for millions of cases and tens of thousands of deaths, mostly of small children – is the parasite Cryptosporidium. Doctors can treat children with Cryptosporidium for dehydration, but unlike many other causes of diarrhea, there are no drugs to kill the parasite or vaccines to prevent infection. Now, researchers […]

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How hepatitis B and delta viruses establish infection of liver cells

Princeton University researchers have developed a new, scalable cell culture system that allows for detailed investigation of how host cells respond to infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and delta virus (HDV). The paper describing their findings was published online on June 18, 2019 in the journal Hepatology. HBV causes an acute illness that is usually rapidly cleared by adults with […]

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Detecting pressure ulcers in sweat and sebum

Pressure ulcers are a major burden to patients, carers and the healthcare system. Particularly vulnerable populations are elderly, bedridden and spinal cord injured individuals. Ph.D. researcher Jibbe Soetens investigated the response of the human skin to prolonged loading. Hospitals can use his results to detect and even predict pressure ulcers. Also the design of, for example, mattresses and wheelchairs can […]

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High soy intake may cut fracture risk in younger breast cancer survivors

(HealthDay)—Higher soy consumption is linked to fewer osteoporotic fractures in younger breast cancer survivors, according to a study published online May 21 in JNCI Cancer Spectrum. Neil Zheng, from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues investigated incidence of osteoporotic bone fracture and its associations with soy food consumption, exercise, and body mass index among 4,139 stage 0 to […]

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Phantom sensations: when the sense of touch deceives

Without being aware of it, people sometimes wrongly perceive tactile sensations. A new study in the scientific journal Current Biology shows how healthy people can sometimes misattribute touch to the wrong side of their body, or even to a completely wrong part of the body. The study was conducted by researchers at Bielefeld University’s Cluster of Excellence CITEC, the University […]

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Using data to decide when to transfer patients by medical helicopter

The increased use of medical helicopters over the last half-century has saved countless lives by quickly getting patients from trauma to the emergency room (ER) within the so-called “golden hour.” But a growing number of medical experts contend emergency helicopters may be overused in some transfer situations. Their concern: Patients stuck with an exorbitant cost for a service that may […]

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How fathers, children should spend time together

As men everywhere brace for an onslaught of ties, tools, wallets and novelty socks gifted for Father’s Day, here are two questions fathers of young children should ask themselves: What activities are best for bonding with my child, and when should those activities take place? New research from the University of Georgia reveals that both the type of involvement—caregiving versus […]

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Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy

A University of Houston engineer is reporting in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons, called the local field potential. Professor of biomedical engineering Joe Francis reports his team’s findings allow for the development […]

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