The middle aged are lonelier than older and younger people

Middle-aged people are lonelier than older adults and young people, new research suggests. Researchers analyzed data from 38,000 people in the U.K. who took part of the BBC’s Loneliness Experiment last year. The lead researchers are: Professor Christina Victor, Brunel University London, Professor Manuela Barreto, University of Exeter, and Professor Pamela Qualter, University of Manchester. They used a new method […]

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Enzyme that helps protect us from stress linked to liver cancer growth

An enzyme induced by stress to help reduce production of damaging free radicals is also used by liver cancer to regulate two major cell proliferation pathways that enable the cancer to thrive, scientists report. They’ve also found that when they block the enzyme Nqo1, it dramatically reduces the proliferation of liver cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer’s ability to survive […]

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Texas cities increasingly susceptible to large measles outbreaks

The growing number of children arriving at Texas schools unvaccinated makes the state increasingly vulnerable to measles outbreaks in cities large and small, according to a computer simulation created by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The findings, published today in the journal JAMA Network Open, indicate that an additional 5% decrease in vaccination rates, which have […]

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Training can reverse nicotine-induced brain damage

Motor-skill training has proved capable of reversing brain impairments in rats treated with nicotine. This effect has been demonstrated in a recent study and, in the long term, the method may also come to be tested as an aid to human smoking cessation. “It was as if the training counteracted many of the changes caused by nicotine in the animals’ […]

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Why initial UTIs increase susceptibility to further infection

More than 60% of women will experience a urinary tract infection (UTI) at some point in their lives, and about a quarter will get a second such infection within six months, for reasons that have been unclear to health experts. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that an initial infection can set the […]

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Interregional differences in somatic genetic landscape diversify prognosis in glioblastoma

Researchers from Osaka University, in cooperation with the Institute for Clinical Research and medical institutes participating in the Kansai Molecular Diagnosis Network for CNS Tumors (KNBTG), conducted the largest-ever retrospective cohort study for Japanese patients with glioblastoma (GBM), proposing an underlying prognosis biomarker responsible for the survival difference between two cohorts: an original Japanese cohort and a dataset from The […]

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Why do women get statins less frequently than men?

Women are less likely than men to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statins—or get them prescribed at guideline-recommended intensity levels when they do, according to a new study that also looked at reasons behind the discrepancies. Statins help reduce the risk of heart attacks, stroke and other cardiovascular events by lowering high cholesterol levels. But women historically have received less aggressive […]

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Burden of obesity-associated cancers shifted to younger age groups

(HealthDay)—From 2000 to 2016, there was a shift of the obesity-associated cancer (OAC) burden to younger age groups, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Network Open. Siran M. Koroukian, Ph.D., from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, and colleagues examined trends in time for age distribution of OACs and non-OACs. Differences by ethnicity […]

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Drug accelerates blood system’s recovery after chemotherapy, radiation

A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem cells after exposure to radiation. If the results can be replicated in humans, the compound could help people recover quicker from chemotherapy, radiation and bone marrow transplants. The study, published in Nature Communications, also sheds light on the basic biology behind blood […]

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In South Africa, newly approved TB regimen drastically cuts treatment time

Four years ago, South African fashion designer Innocent Molefe, 38, was diagnosed with tuberculosis. A year ago, it developed into multi-drug resistant strain requiring painful injections and heaps of pills. Three months after the first round of treatment, he relapsed and started a second round. At the end of it he still wasn’t cured. Thanks to a new treatment—approved Wednesday […]

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